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The Best and Worst Calling Centers of the Holiday Season

December 26, 2013

The holiday seasons are coming to a close and everyone has their gifts, but some still need to make phone calls and returns to keep the festivities running smooth. Unfortunately, dealing with customer support services is tedious and painful. Navigating unclear menus and making dubious choices about which departments to connect to is bad enough, but often it takes several minutes on hold before ever finding out if you've reached the right extension in the first place!

Lucky for everyone who needs to call about a new gift, PleasePress1 is here to help with an amazing new consumer service. By simply searching on their database for the company, store or manufacturer you need to call, you'll be presented with access codes to dial in that will connect you directly to the right operators absolutely free.

As a special holiday present, PleasePress1's founder Nigel Clark (News - Alert) made a list of the nicest – and the naughtiest – customer support lines for the holiday season. He's also included special access codes to make the process go even smoother.

But who exactly makes the list? Among the higher rated companies, he includes chains that subvert the practice of using an annoying phone menu in the first place. The list is topped with Amazon.com, whose customer support line is listed as “A crackling example of customer service – you get straight through, no phone menus.” Nigel also includes Tesco, John Lewis, Lidl, Aldi and HMV among the best companies for a no-hassle support call.

Six companies made it onto PleasePress1's naughty list. Nigel timed how long it took him to reach the right options, so that consumers could see exactly how much time they might be wasting. He also blasts T Mobile's extremely convoluted customer service line, citing 78 options and 6 menu levels as part of a labyrinthine phone network. Some of the worst offenders even make it onto the PleasePress1 “Rage Index,” which lists the 20 worst customer support hotlines.




Edited by Ryan Sartor

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